Two Nerdy History Girls. Thanksgiving Break Monday, November 24, Happy Thanksgiving! Clicking on the image will enlarge it. Clicking on the caption will allow you to read at the source, where you can learn more and enlarge images as needed. Isabella reporting, With Thanksgiving just around the table, I can't be the only one who is trying to mandate a "no phones at the table" rule during the meal.

Apparently I have historical precedent on my side — or at least this amusing parody of Downtown Abbey. This is one sketch from the The Britishesa parody collection currently appearing on DirecTV, and I think I may have to hunt down the rest of the episodes.

Or at least I will as soon as I take this call The prince had to beg through family intermediaries for an invitation to come to England to see the Queen. Albert was foreign and poor. Caricatures, insults, and mocking poetry ensued. Illustration: Prince Alberta print "after George Baxter, —" made after Clicking on the captions will allow you to read at the source, where you can learn more and enlarge images as needed.

Posted by LorettaChase at AM Labels: historyinteresting peopleLoretta ChaseportraitsQueen VictoriaquotationsVictorian eraweddings and marriage Comments: 1 comments so far add a comment. Indispensable Objects for Dressing a Wig, c. He created a tea table the hostess could make revolve via a foot pedal, to bring each cup to her in turn.

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He made a bell device to let servants know what the master wanted at a given time. He created a type of roller skate—but having failed to provide brakes, he crashed into a mirror. For example, King George III might have endured physician abusebut he did enjoy one of the mechanical chairs.

Treatment with tractors Loretta reports: Among other research for Dukes Prefer Blondesmy current WIP, I've been looking at medical books and treatises from the early s. These leave one amazed that any of the patients survived their treatments.

Even monarchs suffered at their physicians' hands. This Horrible History is, if anything, quite an understatement, and King George III was by no means the only royal tortured by his doctors. Readers who receive our blog via email might see a rectangle, square, or nothing where the video ought to be.

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To watch the video, please click on the title to this post. Merlin's Mechanical Chair Wednesday, November 12, Look for more about the mysterious Merlin fellow in a future blog.

Mechanical chair described. A Fashion Worth Reviving? Isabella reporting, Great English country houses often appear in the books that I write, and I'll freely confess that the theatrical grandeur of William Kent's designs for Houghton Hall have inspired several of those fictitious houses. Walpole was a statesman who rose to become Britain's first prime minister, and he wanted his house to reflect his taste, his power, his wealth, and his ambitions.

Kent was one of the Georgian era's most creative individuals, with talents that included architecture, painting, landscape architecture, and furniture design. The important commission for the interiors of Houghton Hall, begun aroundtook nearly ten years to complete; this video is only seven minutes long, but it does give you a glimpse of the extravagant imagination of William Kent as well as the lavish lives of the early Georgians.

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A "Lady with a Scarf," c. Fashions for November Tuesday, November 4, What structure there is tends to be concentrated on the bodice. These dresses show some beautiful work on the bodice and neckline, and the scarves or tippets add drama.I wonder how dangerous the wig carrot was to the user, with that opportunity to inhale fine silicates!

Lung disease was everywhere in the 18th century, and this must've been just one more contributor! Thanks for this very interesting post--I've never seen either object before! Nancy N. There was a lovely moment in the movie "Amadeus" where Mozart is shopping for wigs, and gets powdered -- he says that the wigs are all so lovely that he wishes he had three heads to wear them all. Post a Comment.

Two Nerdy History Girls. November 19, at PM Post a Comment. Newer Post Older Post Home. Subscribe to: Post Comments Atom. Share This. One of us -- Susan Holloway Scott -- writes historical novels,and as Isabella Bradford, wrote historical romances, too. To us, the everyday details of life in the past are things to talk about, ponder, make fun of -- much in the way normal people talk about their favorite reality show. We try to sort out rumor or myth from fact.

This blog is for them. Tweets by 2nerdyhistgirls. A Bridegroom's Embroider A "Lady with a Scarf," c. Search This Blog. Blogs We Follow. Pilgrim Mary Brewster c arrived on The Mayflower 6 months ago.

Portrait of 18C American Woman 5 weeks ago. Carriage Ride 13 hours ago. Working From Home Part 2 6 days ago. All Things Georgian. The Yorkshire Little Man 1 week ago. Attingham Park. A special wedding anniversary 11 months ago. Viridarium Novum 4 years ago. Boston Brooklyn Historical Society Blog. From Servants to Staff: How Many? Chetham's Library.

the hazards of traveling by chaise, c. 1770

The Last Post 3 years ago. Chicago History Museum Blog. Clothes on Film. Cooking in the Archives. To Make a Lemon Tart 4 days ago.Some years ago I found a wonderful book by Susanna E. Lewis - there is a marvelous 19th century sampler in the Brooklyn Museum, white cotton lace still on its steel needles. She decided to document it and quickly realized the only way to really understand it was to start at the beginning and progress as the maker did. I enclose the link, only so you can see this wonderful piece.

Ooh, Elena, thank you! I've added that to my ever-huge wish list. I've knitted all my life, but only in the last few years have I begun to really work at lace knitting. The examples from the 18thth c are beyond my comprehension, using thread and needles so fine that they aren't even available now. Such beautiful work by very talented women of the past I just love the intriguing and interesting things that you post on this blog, and I so wish that I could get to the Winterthur Museum to see these particular items.

Since I can't, I appreciate even more the things you share with us from there. BTW, did you mean to type "July 15, " instead of the "July 15, " that is in the post? Thank you, Unknown! I'm glad you're enjoying the posts.

I know the feeling about exhibitions, too; all the really cool things always seem to be in California or London or any other place Where I'm Not.

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And um yes, I did intend to type Which I have done now. The perils of writing in the past Post a Comment. Two Nerdy History Girls. November 4, at AM Unknown said November 4, at PM Post a Comment. Newer Post Older Post Home. Subscribe to: Post Comments Atom.

Share This. One of us -- Susan Holloway Scott -- writes historical novels,and as Isabella Bradford, wrote historical romances, too. To us, the everyday details of life in the past are things to talk about, ponder, make fun of -- much in the way normal people talk about their favorite reality show.

We try to sort out rumor or myth from fact. This blog is for them. Tweets by 2nerdyhistgirls. A Bridegroom's Embroider A "Lady with a Scarf," c.Post chaisefour-wheeled, closed carriagecontaining one seat for two or three passengers, that was popular in 18th-century England.

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Because the driver rode one of the horses, it was possible to have windows in front as well as at the sides. The carriage was built for long-distance travel, and so horses were changed at intervals at posts stations.

In England, public post chaises were painted yellow and could be hired, along with the driver and two horses, for about a shilling a mile.

The post chaise is descended from the 17th-century two-wheeled French chaise. Post chaise. Article Media. Info Print Cite. Submit Feedback. Thank you for your feedback. The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree See Article History.

Learn More in these related Britannica articles:.

the hazards of traveling by chaise, c. 1770

Carriage, four-wheeled, horse-drawn vehicle, the final refinement of the horse-drawn passenger conveyance. Wagons were also used for this purpose, as were chariots.

the hazards of traveling by chaise, c. 1770

By the 13th century the chariot had evolved into a four-wheeled form, unlike the earlier two-wheeled version most often associated…. Transportation, the movement of goods and persons from place to place and the various means by which such movement is accomplished. The growth of the ability—and the need—to transport large quantities of goods or numbers of people over long distances at high speeds in comfort and safety has been an….

Stagecoach, any public coach regularly travelling a fixed route between two or more stations stages.

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Used in London at least byand about 20 years later in Paris, stagecoaches reached their greatest importance in England and the United States in the 19th century, where the new macadam roads…. History at your fingertips. Sign up here to see what happened On This Dayevery day in your inbox!

Email address. By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Notice. Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox. Article History.The body of the carriage was set in front of the axle with its bottom lower than the shafts. At first, the passenger drove the horse from within; later, the chaise was managed by a driver riding the horse. The chaise was adapted and widely used in both 18th-century England and the United States.

The New Englandor Boston, chaise, which was suspended on a combination of leather thoroughbraces and wooden cantilever springs, was uniquely American. The chaise was one of the most important passenger vehicles of the 18th century, and in America its popularity foreshadowed that of the buggy a hundred years later.

The word chaise was also applied indiscriminately to numerous varieties of carriage. Article Media. Info Print Cite. Submit Feedback. Thank you for your feedback. The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica Encyclopaedia Britannica's editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree See Article History.

Learn More in these related Britannica articles: One-horse shay. One-horse shay, open two-wheeled vehicle that was the American adaptation of the French chaise. Its chairlike body, seating the passengers on one seat above the axle, was hung by leather braces from a pair of square wooden springs attached to the shafts.

Early one-horse shays had fixed standing…. Carriage, four-wheeled, horse-drawn vehicle, the final refinement of the horse-drawn passenger conveyance.

Wagons were also used for this purpose, as were chariots. By the 13th century the chariot had evolved into a four-wheeled form, unlike the earlier two-wheeled version most often associated….

Transportation, the movement of goods and persons from place to place and the various means by which such movement is accomplished. The growth of the ability—and the need—to transport large quantities of goods or numbers of people over long distances at high speeds in comfort and safety has been an….

History at your fingertips. Sign up here to see what happened On This Dayevery day in your inbox! Email address. By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Notice. Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox. Article History.There were a variety of vehicles found in France in the and s.

Here is the list A to Z. They were so named because of their speed or ability to fly when they carried the injured off the battlefield and to the rear where surgeons could more effectively deal with their wounds. These ambulance volantes proved so effective and so serviceable to the critically wounded that they served as the forerunner to the modern military ambulance and triage system eventually adapted by armies throughout the world.

Ambulance Volante Flying Ambulance developed by Larrey to quickly transport the wounded from the battlefield to field hospitals. Courtesy of Wikipedia.

It was a member of the Coach family, and, in fact, a cut-down coach that consisted of an under-carriage and lower quarters of a coach, including the lower half of a door with a hood covering the back seat, in place of a full-paneled top or Landau top. Barouchet — Diminutive of Barouche. It also marked an important era in the mechanical development of the Coach. It had a double perch and thorough braces and belonged to the period of gaudy ornamentation, when coaches were elaborately carved and gilded.

In the s, it was vaguely used to apply to a full-paneled Coach. Braeck — This was the same term used in Germany and was a corruption of the English term Break. It was a member of the Phaeton group and described as a heavy driving vehicle.

Post chaise

It was generally driven with four horses when out for an airing in a park and only two horses when used in a chase. Such a carriage could accommodate from six to eight persons, including the driver and servants. An alternative spelling was Britzska, commonly pronounced as if spelled bris-ka.

It was derived from a Russian word said to be derived from the Polish bryczka, a diminutive of bryka, the freight wagon. The Briska was a member of the Coach group and said to be a variation of the basic Barouche. It was essentially a traveling carriage used throughout Europe during the first part of the s.

There were numerous accommodations for traveling in it and an endless variety of contrivances for sleeping, eating, reading, and carrying luggage. A uthor, inventor and locomotive engineer, William Bridge Adams claimed it became one of the most common of all carriages. A projection behind is adapted for bedding, and the front part is an elongation for the limbs. In addition to the ordinary lamps, a ready lamp can be attached behind to the back light, — an important convenience for traveling.

One or two servants may be carried on the boot behind; and attached to the locker before is a board, which, when let down, forms a foot-board; a seat being placed on the locker, an arrangement is thus made for driving.

An imperial can go on the roof; and, if the hind boot be taken away, one or two large trunks may be substituted. The front foot-board may also be let down to a horizontal level, and thus carry a large trunk. Brouette — By the late s this term was obsolete.

However, it described a French vehicle, the body of which resembled a Sedan Chairmounted on two wheels, and drawn by a man. Brouettes were the contemporaries of Sedan Chairs, and the proprietors of the latter interfered to get Brouettes prohibited. They were successful for a time, but, inBrouettes were in general use in Paris as public hacks. A sedan chair designed by Robert Adam for Queen Charlotte, Felton said:.

They are built like other Phaetons or Chaises, and, to ascertain their value, is to subtract one-twelfth from the statement of a common sized carriage, finished to any pattern. The buggy of the late s was a member of the Phaeton family and was a typical American vehicle of primitive form and simple construction that consisted of a box body, accommodated one or two passengers, and mounted on four wheels.

It was a two-wheeled public vehicle.

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The term Cab was first used in France when the original two-wheeled Cabriolet became the street hack of Paris.I'm aware of the word "grip" which used to mean a small piece of luggage, a bag used for travelling, and I wonder whether this might be what a grippine is? Maybe that's the origin of the word "grip" used n that sense?

Vehicles Found in France in the 1700 and 1800s: A-Z

Although why the poor man should have to carry his bag when it should have been possible to fit it into or onto the chaise, I don't know. I always assumed it was his horse-- either the variety of horse, or the name of the horse. My guess falls with Jacqui, that "grippine" refers to a horse. Perhaps the name is a variation of the Roman empress's name Agrippina, since classically-inspired names were so popular in this era for favorite animals.

The suitcase suggestion, while accurate by definition, makes little sense in the context of letter. Why would the man be walking on foot until they brought him his suitcase?

Could this be the another term for pattens? But if this referred to overshoes or pattens, then why would it be singular? Also the implication is that he ceases "march[ing] on foot" once the item is brought to him. What a mystery! One of those turns of phrase that presumably meant something to the recipient but leaves us scratching our heads!

I wonder if it is possible to read an image of the actual letter itself, for several reasons. I cannot tell from this post how much diluted or distorted are Lady Hester's original words. She also used some form of emphasis, which has been translated using italicized font in typeset, but it's not clear how she indicated emphasis using quill pen.

Both the sporadic use of French terms and emphasis could have distorted the original word, resulting in a misinterpretation. I don't believe the letter in the text above is included in this work at Archive. Given the context surrounding the word printed as "grippine," and finding no such word in French, I wonder if Lady Hester actually wrote, "grimpe," a French noun referring to climbing, or to a device like a step to allow one to rise up in this case, step into an elevated vehicle.

Food for thought. I have actually ordered the Tunstall biography now -- hoping he gives a reference. If it's in the Chatham Papers it should be easy to track down the letter. Lady Chatham's handwriting was quite unusual but, by and large, extremely legible, so I think it's unlikely to have been mistranscribed. Agree though context may have been removed. And obviously there could have been a blot or a tear making it more difficult than usual to make out. Is she referring to a saddle of some sort, perhaps?

Is Bradford riding postillion on the chaise? Seems to make sense if I've got the math right it's like an 18th C.

the hazards of traveling by chaise, c. 1770

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